Context Resources for Military Living Spaces

Living Spaces:   MultiFamily   Student   Military   Correctional   Medical   SingleFamily
Composite Communities:  Upscale   Mainstay   Working   Country   Aspiring   Urban

Selected Context Resources for  Military Living Spaces

Each of the six military living spaces offers a unique living situation.  Below are non-religious resources that describe and discuss military living contexts.

 
Undaunted: The Real Story of America's Servicewomen in Today's Military
by Tanya Biank

Tanya Biank gives us the inside story of women in today’s military—their professional and personal challenges from the combat zone to the home front.

 
Counseling Military Families: What Mental Health Professionals Need to Know
by Lynn K. Hall

According to the United States Department of Defense, by the end of 1993 there were 2,036,646 reservists and family members and 3,343,235 active duty and family members for a total of 5,379,781 people affected by the military. Since then, because of the conflict in Iraq, the numbers have dramatically increased. While we have always had military families in our midst, not since the Vietnam War have their struggles been so vivid, particularly with alarming rates of increase of both suicide and divorce among military personnel. The face of the military has changed; for the first time a volunteer army is serving in a major combat zone, the level of reservists serving is unprecedented, the percentage of women soldiers in virtually all positions is unprecedented and most of the soldiers have left spouses and/or families behind. The objectives of Counseling Military Families are to help the practicing counselor understand how the military works, what issues are constants for the military family, and what stressors are faced by the military member and the family. The book will begin with an overview of military life, including demographic information and examples of military family issues, before delving into specific chapters focused on the unique circumstances of reservists, career service personnel, spouses, and children. The final section of the book will present treatment models and targeted interventions tailored for use with military families. This book will help counselor…

 
Once a Warrior--Always a Warrior
by Charles W. Hoge M.D.

The essential handbook for anyone who has ever returned from a war zone, and their spouse, partner, or family members. Being back home can be as difficult, if not more so, than the time spent serving in a combat zone. It's with this truth that Colonel Charles W. Hoge, MD, a leading advocate for eliminating the stigma of mental health care, presents Once a Warrior -- Always a Warrior, a groundbreaking resource with essential new insights for anyone who has ever returned home from a war zone. In clear practical language, Dr. Hoge explores the latest knowledge in combat stress, PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury), other physiological reactions to war, and their treatment options. Recognizing that warriors and family members both change during deployment, he helps them better understand each other's experience, especially living with enduring survival skills from the combat environment that are often viewed as "symptoms" back home. The heart of this book focuses on what's necessary to successfully navigate the transition -- "LANDNAV" for the home front. Once a Warrior -- Always a Warrior shows how a warrior's knowledge and skills are vital for living at peace in an insane world.

 
Raising Children in the Military (Military Life)
by Cheryl Lawhorne-Scott (Author), Don Philpott (Author), Jeff Scott (Author

Military life places unique demands on military families with children including frequent moves, disruptions in schooling, family separation, health care issues, loss of friends, financial hardships, underemployment of military spouses, and the ever present threat of risk of injury or death of loved ones deployed. But learning how to navigate these challenges can help prepare families for those events as they arise. Here, the authors have assembled information about common problem areas and have included detailed information about solutions and resources available. The information in this guide has been carefully gathered from hundreds of sources and resources and includes the most up to date information about child services and benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs, allowing serving members of the military with children to quickly access information that they need regarding all aspects of child care, from raising a family to education, and from coping with constant moves to grief counseling. It also covers other critical issues such as wellness, family solidarity, benefits, insurance and problems such as addiction and domestic violence. Readers will gain a better understanding of what child services and benefits are available and how to obtain them as well as secrets for successful relationships and family bonding.

 
Married to the military
by Meredith Leyv

Whether you're dating, engaged, or married to an active military servicemember or reservist -- or you've just signed up yourself -- you may feel as if you've somehow married the United States military! While there are plenty of orientation books for him, there are almost no handy, user-friendly resources for you. Meredith Leyva, a military wife and founder of CinCHouse.com, the Internet's largest community for military wives, girlfriends, and women in uniform, details everything you need to know to manage day-to-day issues and get on with the adventure of military life. From relocation to deployment, protocol to finances, and career to kids, Leyva offers time-tested advice about: • Keeping your love life together during deployments • Relocating yourself and your family around the world • Maintaining your own career when you're expected to move every three years • Understanding what pay and benefits you're entitled to -- and how to maximize them • Translating those odd acronyms and jargon Written by a seasoned military wife, this smart and savvy guide will help you take control at every point of your servicemember's career -- from filing marriage papers as newlyweds to choosing prenatal and child care when you start a family to figuring out his pension when he's ready to retire.

 
Handbook of Counseling Military Couples
by Bret A. Moore (Editor)

The military imposes unique and often severe challenges to couples, which clinicians -- particularly the growing numbers of civilian clinicians who see military couples -- often struggle to address. These problems are only compounded by misunderstandings and misconceptions about what it means to be part of a specific branch of the military and part of the military as a whole. Handbook of Counseling Military Couples includes a clear, thorough introduction to military culture and to couple relationships in the military. But more than that, it provides readers with expert analyses of the special types of issues that come up for military couples and shows clinicians how to address them productively. In the chapters, readers will find the answers to questions such as how are military couples' rights different from those of civilians? What attitudes and beliefs about relationships might military members bring to a session, and how are those different from those of civilians? What is the state of marriage and divorce in each of the branches and within the military in general? For a particular treatment modality, how does research in with military members compare to that of civilians? When should particular treatment strategies be used, and why -- and how?

 
Couple-Based Interventions for Military and Veteran Families: A Practitioner's Guide
by Douglas K. Snyder PhD (Editor), Candice M. Monson PhD (Editor)

Presenting couple-based interventions uniquely tailored to the mental health needs of military and veteran couples and families, this book is current, practical, and authoritative. Chapters describe evidence-based interventions for specific disorders—such as posttraumatic stress, depression, and substance abuse—and related clinical challenges, including physical aggression, infidelity, bereavement, and parenting concerns. Clear guidelines for assessment and treatment are illustrated with helpful case examples; 18 reproducible handouts can be downloaded and printed in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size. The book also provides essential knowledge on the culture of military families and the normative transitions and adjustments they face.

 
Housing: Policies, Procedures, and Practices for Determining Requirements for Military Family Housing and Quarters
by U. S. Government Accountability Office

GAO reviewed the Department of Defense's (DOD) program for obtaining funds to build additional housing facilities at various military installations, focusing on determining the requirements for military family housing and bachelor officer and enlisted quarters. GAO noted that: (1) DOD's 1968 request for family housing was of questionable validity principally because there was not, at the installations reviewed, a proper evaluation of existing available housing in nearby communities; (2) lack of proper evaluation of available housing at each installation precludes, in GAO's opinion, appropriate establishment of priorities of need for housing among installations, required because of the limited funds available; (3) GAO found also that the family housing studies were unnecessarily costly and complex and that DOD internal audit agencies had not been reviewing family housing requirements at the installations it reviewed; (4) GAO found a need for DOD to improve its determination of requirements for bachelor officers' quarters and barracks; and (5) DOD internal audit agencies had not been reviewing requirements for bachelor quarters at the installations.

 
Military Brats: Legacies of Childhood Inside the Fortress
by Mary Edwards Wertsch

A startling, groundbreaking exploration, Military Brats is the first book to identify a cultural group--children of the military--that had been completely below the societal radar. Based on five years of research, including in-depth interviews with eighty military brats from all the armed services as well as physicians, teachers, psychologists, social workers, and others, this book finds the patterns that link all military children to a common cultural identity. Wertsch employs extensive research to probe the consequences—both positive and negative—of being raised in a family characterized by rigid discipline, nomadic rootlessness, dedication to military mission, and the threat of war and personal loss. With its clear-eyed, sometimes shocking depictions of alcoholism and domestic violence, and its empathy for military parents caught up in an extremely demanding way of life, Military Brats provides catharsis, insight, and a path toward healing. Mary Wertsch not only defines America’s most invisible minority for the very first time, she also passionately exhorts the children of warriors to come to terms with their native Fortress legacies so that they might take full advantage of the positive endowment that is also their birthright. Civilians will find this book eye-opening. Military parents will find it at once challenging and sympathetic. And military brats will know in their hearts that this is the book they’ve been waiting for.